Saturday, March 01, 2008

The dry hot summer in colorful shades of pink and green. January and February are our hottest months. It was the end of February today and I already noticed for some days that the sun was up later than me. From now on the temperatures will be cooler with just some hot days between. However until the rain starts in six weeks or more, the soil will dry out more.


The very dry aloes are hanging on to their water reserves - waiting not growing. Each season has a distinct attractiveness in the aloe and succulents garden.



Aloe microstigma turned into shades of orange-pink and shows off very pretty in the garden, but on the mountain slopes where they grow, they are near to invisible between rocks and dry bushes.



The leaves are rolled up like narrow spikes. The fine bushes keep the roots cool and the pale green background is a good contrast against the aloes.
Aloe khamiesensis which grows in a very harsh habitat.

One thing I really like about the dry summer - no weeds in summer!

9 comments:

Desire Fourie said...

Hi Eurica. I stumbled upon your blog whilst searching the web for aloe names. I have become a huge aloe fan. We have relocated from Kloof in KZN to Dainfern Ridge in Fourways Gauteng during the end of last year and are landscaping our small garden space around our new house in an estate. We are mainly landscaping an indigenous garden with quite a variety of aloe species. I wondered if you perhaps know the botanical name for the hedgehog aloe ... a new species launched a year or two ago here in SA. You are welcome to visit my blog www.desiref.blogspot.com to look at the progress of us landscaping our garden. I love photography, nature and hiking. Me and my husband try and do one big hike every 1 to 2 years. Its interesting my dad who has passed away a few years ago also grew up in Moorreesburg. Love to hear from you. Desire Fourie

Yolanda Elizabet said...

Your poor garden certainly looks parched. Hopefully there will be some rain soon!

Maikel said...

Big collection :)

Dee said...

Hi Eurica- I really enjoyed visiting your blog- it is neat to see the varieties of aloe the grow in South Africa- we have aloe in Arizona!

Pomona Belvedere said...

Hello Eurica, I enjoyed spending more time here looking at aloes and appreciating your photos and garden design. I learn a lot when I visit your site!

Louisette said...

Congratulations wonderfull aloes 's fotos, caming from your other blog cats , nice always, but i have no flowers on my blog passion retriever,only few with tomjutte in links , likasifotos ..for that i send a nice place friends in Brussel, full flowers, tapyn 's flowers on great plaats Brusel.

ericat said...

Desire I already answered to you but just in case somebody else is interested in the hedgehog aloe:- It is a complicated hybrid and the plants used is a secret kept by the person who made the hybrid. It takes years from seeds. In each generation the best plants are improved with a new pollintation.

ericat said...

louisette Your blog is gorgeous. It is refreshing to relax among the flowers and graphics. The photos of Brussels are lovely. The beautiful old architectures of Europe and the UK with the flower boxes are such a treat. We do not have either in South Africa

catzgarden said...

Hi, Eurica - I found you on Blotanical...I live in Santa Barbara, California, and we have aloes everywhere - thanks to South Africa! Horticulturists began bringing them here at the turn of the century, and they love our climate, too.

They are some of my favorite plants...I am adding you as a favorite, because of you knowledge, your pics, and the incredible variety you have. Please keep writing and educating us!
Thanks - catzgarden